How to Build a Sustainable Recreation Economy in Alpine County at August meeting.

We live in a beautiful forested mountain community, but with a few exceptions we don’t take full advantage of it.  Recreation, in particular muscle-powered recreation, can be the basis of a vibrant economy.  This month we are lucky to have a number of experts to share their experiences elsewhere and give us ideas of what we could achieve here in Alpine County.

Joe Flower, a Presidential Management Fellow, detailed to the USFS Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit and Devin Middlebrook, Sustainability Program Coordinator for the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency will be presenting on the collaborative sustainable recreation planning process in the Lake Tahoe Basin.  Joe and Devin will share why they’re pursuing a sustainable recreation plan for the Basin and how Alpine County might consider looking at its recreation assets and experiences.

Jonathan Cook-Fisher, National Recreation Special Uses Program Manager at the Washington DC office of the USFS Recreation, Heritage and Volunteer Services program will be presenting on national policy and legislation related to outdoor recreation planning and permitting within the USFS.  He will share insights on the programs he’s developing that may improve processes for improving recreation experiences on USFS public lands.

Dan Morris of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest will be talking about what the Humboldt-Toiyabe is doing to promote recreation in the Humboldt-Toiyabe.

Lastly, but not least, Danna Stroud of the Sierra Nevada Conservancy will by presenting recently released recreation and tourism economy data.  Also, many thanks to Danna for organizing this month’s presentations.

This will be our last meeting sponsored by the National Forest Foundation.  Although we didn’t spend all the money we did run into an immovable deadline.  A couple of individuals have stepped forward and have agreed to continue to fund us for the foreseeable future.  To celebrate there will be a light supper available at the meeting, and it will include some sinful deserts as well as an healthy alternative.  The celebration is not that the National Forest Foundation grant is expiring, but that there are individuals that believe enough in what the ABC is doing to support it financially.  We hope you can come.

The September meeting is scheduled for Tuesday September 5th at 6:00 pm at Turtle Rock Park.

The Alpine Biomass Committee is supported by a grant from the National Forest Foundation with funds coming from Region 5 of the U.S. Forest Service.  This organization isis an equal opportunity provider.

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August Meeting Summary

Our meeting on August 1st, 2017 at Turtle Rock Park was poorly attended with just 11 members of the public and agencies present.  Nevertheless the presentation was informative and generated lots of questions.

Jason Davenport, Master Craftsworker with Mono County, described the funding, project design, costs savings and productivity of the Mono County thermal biomass boiler.  The unit, which was manufactured in Germany, generates sufficient heat for Mono County’s Public Works buildings in Bridgeport, the coldest place in California.  The feasibility study for the project was funded by the Great Basin Unified Air Pollution Control District and a Sustainable Communities Planning Grant, and the Sierra Nevada Conservancy funded the purchase and installation of the boiler.  The boiler was installed last fall and replaced an aging propane fueled boiler.  Estimated operating costs for the biomass boiler were $24,600/year in comparison with the propane boiler cost of $74, 600/year producing a saving of $50,000/year.  Biomass fuel primarily comes from municipal wood waste that was previously sent to a land fill, but the unit also uses excess biomass from the forest.

Participant updates included the following.  Amy Horne, Saving the West, reported that the Annual Lake Tahoe Summit is August 22, at Valhalla Tahoe in South Lake Tahoe.  Ron Hames reviewed possible locations for a wood processing campus, including BLM ground around Turtle Rock Park. David Griffith reported the Economic Development Administration (EDA) is interested in funding a feasibility study for a wood processing campus.  David Griffith also reported that the EDA grant matching funds are reduced from 50% to 20% for Alpine County because of its designation as a disaster area.  One possible source for the 20% matching funds is the Northern California Community Loan Fund.

The next meeting is set for Tuesday September the 5th at 6:00 pm at Turtle Rock Park.  The subject of the meeting will be the economic development possibilities of a recreation economy and will feature presenters from the US Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, the National Recreation Special Uses Program, and the Sierra Nevada Conservancy.

To contact us you can either leave a comment on this blog, or for a private comment, visit our contact us page.

The Alpine Biomass Committee is supported by a grant from the National Forest Foundation with funds coming from Region 5 of the U.S. Forest Service.  This organization is an equal opportunity provider.

July Meeting Summary and August Meeting Heads Up

Our joint meeting with the Alpine Watershed Group (AWG) on July 11th, 2017 at Turtle Rock Park was well attended with 24 members of the public and agencies present.  Unfortunately, due to a large number of fires in the area Forest Service and BLM personnel were unable to attend.  Gavin Feiger of the AWG stepped up to the plate at the last minute and put on a great presentation of the West Carson Project.

Updates were presented by the AWG on the Carson Water Subconservancy District’s (CWSD) Carson River Adaptive Stewardship Plan.  Specific projects included American Rivers Blue Lakes Road, Log Crib Stabilization, Cut Off Protection, and the Carson Watershed Meadows Assessment.  On July 26th the Carson Meadows stakeholders will be holding a meeting from 10 am to 1 pm.  Contact Gavin Feiger (awg.gavin@gmail.com) if you are interested in participating or learning more.  The Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board and the Environmental Protection Agency discussed the new Vision Priority program that they will be conducting on the West Fork.  They anticipate completing their assessment in 2020.

Aly Cheney completed the data summary of water quality in Alpine County that she has been working on.  In addition to making the data available to the public it describes how a water body gets listed as impaired. It is presented as a monitoring story map available here.

A discussion was held on the practice of “fire borrowing” which is what happens when federal agencies such as the Forest Service and BLM spend their entire fire-fighting budget before the end of the fiscal year.  Any additional funds needed for fire-fighting are taken from the agencies’ other budgets such as planning, fuels reduction and forest thinning etc.  These are the very programs that reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire.  It was agreed to send a letter to our political masters in Washington requesting that they resolve this problem.  There is a growing bi-partisan consensus on solving it, and copies of the letters are available here.

Participant updates included the following.  The AWG’s Markleeville Creek Day is Sept. 9th and the Aspen Festival is Oct. 7th and 8th.  The Alpine Trails Association has worked at Kurtz Lake and Thornburg Canyon and will return to work once the summer heat abates.  They also reported that Kirkwood and Bear Valley are considering adding mountain biking to their activities.  The Alpine Fire Safe Council is working on the Community Wildfire Protection Plan and there will be public meetings prior to its finalization.

The August meeting will be a bit different from what we have been used to.  Jason Davenport, a Master Craftsworker with Mono County, will be giving a presentation on their new biothermal heating plant (or boiler) that Mono County installed to heat their public works buildings in Bridgeport.  Mono County had been spending as much as $100,000/year for propane to heat the buildings.  In Mono County’s case the biomass does not currently come from the forest, but is municipal wood waste that Mono County was required to divert from their waste stream.

The next meeting is set for Tuesday August 1st  at 6:00 pm at Turtle Rock Park.

To contact us you can either leave a comment on this blog, or for a private comment, visit our contact us page.

The Alpine Biomass Committee is supported by a grant from the National Forest Foundation with funds coming from Region 5 of the U.S. Forest Service.  This organization is an equal opportunity provider.

Alpine Watershed Group and Alpine Biomass Committee July Joint Meeting

The Alpine Biomass Committee (ABC) and Alpine Watershed Group (AWG) are combining their regularly scheduled meetings in July, bringing together a larger audience to discuss the West Fork of the Carson River watershed. There are a number of entities working on forest and watershed and this will be an opportunity to further collaboration. Some of the familiar areas of the West Carson Watershed include Hope Valley, Charity Valley, Faith Valley, Blue Lakes, and Burnside Lake. The Forest Service (Carson Ranger District) is working towards a larger landscape view for the restoration activities that take place on the district. The USFS goal is to integrate their past, present, and future activities to develop restoration actions addressing all resources in a multiple use approach. With that goal in mind, the USFS West Carson River Watershed Restoration project will provide for wildlife habitat, forest health, watershed improvements, fuels reduction, and improved recreation uses. Similarly, U.S. EPA and Lahontan Water Board have named the West Carson a “Vision Priority” river which allows a new approach to watershed planning. Many other partners such as Friends of Hope Valley, American Rivers, The Washoe Tribe, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Carson River Subconservancy District, Bureau of Land Management, and the Alpine Watershed Group have small and large projects in the watershed. We look forward to project updates and discussions in order to cooperatively address the many goals and objectives in the West Carson watershed.

After the joint meeting the ABC will have a short organizational meeting that will include deciding on whether to apply for an Economic Development Administration (EDA) grant, and what to do about funding going forward.

The July meeting is scheduled for Tuesday July 11th at 6:00 pm at Turtle Rock Park.

The Alpine Biomass Committee is supported by a grant from the National Forest Foundation with funds coming from Region 5 of the U.S. Forest Service.  This organization is an equal opportunity provider.

June Meeting Summary

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Craig Thomas  photo by Annie Dean

Our meeting on June 6th, 2017 at Turtle Rock Park was well attended with 18 members of the public and agencies present.  At least a couple of participants were not able to attend due to their volunteer service on the fire department that was fighting the Payne Fire.

Craig Thomas with the Sierra Forest Legacy gave a presentation on the importance of restoring fire on the landscape in the Sierra Nevada.  Fire has been an important part of the Sierra Nevada’s forests probably since the end of the ice age approximately 10,000 years ago.  Prescribed fire was practiced by Native Americans for at least several hundred years prior to European settlement.  Consequently fire was a key part of the environment that produced the ideal natural forest that we think of and have tried to protect by suppressing fire.  Unfortunately in many places this has led to an overstocked unhealthy forest which is prone to catastrophic wildfires that did not occur prior to about 1880 when the policy of fire suppression was implemented.   Prescribed fire or controlled burns can restore fire to the landscape and reduce the risk of future catastrophic wildfires.  Craig Thomas’ presentation is available on the downloads page and is well worth reviewing for those that were unable to attend the meeting.

The MOU Fire Partnership was initially formed between the Sierra Forest Legacy and CALFIRE to promote the return of fire to the landscape.  The partnership has since been joined by Region 5 of the US Forest Service, the California Forestry Association, several other non-government organizations, and three prescribed fire councils.  We are hopeful that the Carson Ranger District and/or the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest of Region 4 will also join.

Participant updates included the following.  The Alpine Watershed Group’s monitoring training is up and running.  The Natural Resources Conservation Service is interested in collaboration on private land to promote forest and watershed health.  The BLM is looking at options for fuels reduction near Manzanita Lane. The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest has policy changes related to cutting firewood and portions of the Washington Fire area will be open for firewood cutting.  The CHIPS crew has embarked on a four year Tahoe Restoration Agreement with the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit for work on sacred grounds and fuels reduction.  Up to 32 members will receive fire training and two or three will be selected for full time training and positions with the Forest Service.  The Sierra Forest Legacy is reviewing the El Dorado and Stanislaus National Forests’ updates to their forest plans.  The Sierra Nevada Conservancy’s Governing Board approved new Proposition 1 grant guidelines and the grant application process will open on June 15.  Eight million dollars are available.  There will be a Trails Workshop in Mammoth on July 8-9, combining classroom and outdoor training with high level experts.  The Amador-Calaveras Consensus Group is working on a six month strategic planning process to prepare beyond CFLRA funding.  Saving the West was awarded a Wood Utilization Grant for $250,000 to study the availability of biomass and possible commercial uses for it in the eastern Sierra Nevada and western Nevada.

The next meeting is set for Tuesday July 11th in the late afternoon and evening  It will be a joint meeting with the Alpine Watershed Group and will include a tour of the West Carson Project followed by a discussion and regular meeting.  Details to come.

To contact us you can either leave a comment on this blog, or for a private comment, visit our contact us page.

The Alpine Biomass Committee is supported by a grant from the National Forest Foundation with funds coming from Region 5 of the U.S. Forest Service.  This organization is an equal opportunity provider.

Craig Thomas to present at June meeting.

Craig Thomas of the Sierra Forest Legacy (SFL) will be making a presentation on prescribed fire and the Fire MOU Partnership between Region 5 of the US Forest Service, CALFIRE, the Sierra Nevada Conservancy, the California Forestry Association, SFL and several other non-government organizations, and three prescribed fire councils.

The purpose of the Fire MOU Partnership is to increase the use of fire to meet ecological and other management objectives.  It is grounded in the understanding that while it will always be important to protect human life and property,  fire exclusion and a century of intensive fire suppression comes with some serious costs including ecological, economic, carbon, and  public health and safety.  Fire has helped define the California landscape for tens of thousands of years, as has precipitation, but recently we are seeing increasing fire size and intensity and emissions outputs that are extremely damaging to public health.   While there is no-no fire option for a landscape like California’s there are ways to work with fire to increase the natural resource and public benefits. Increasing the pace and scale of restoration must include a significantly expanded, well managed, fire program if we are to attain landscape resilience.

Close coordination with air quality regulators is also essential in dealing with the challenging issues of emission trade-offs, burn windows, achieving ecological scale of forest resilience, early public notification and other important factors.

Craig Thomas was the co-founder of SFL in 1996.  He started out work as SFL’s Conservation Director and became Executive Director in 2000 until 2012.  During this time he oversaw all of SFL’s programmatic work, fundraising, strategy and engagement with stakeholders, media, agency and political decision-makers and staff oversight.  Today he has stepped back to part-time and coordinates SFL’s Forest Conservation Program.  He has been intimately involved in the protection and restoration of the forests of the Sierra Nevada for over twenty-five years and continues working to find solutions to the threats facing Sierra Nevada forests and communities today.

Craig has a BA degree in cultural ecology, which is the study of the ecological, economic, social and spiritual relationship of people to their landscapes.  He has lead SFL’s efforts to not only defend the Sierra Nevada from excessive logging but to also protect Sierra communities from wildfire and to find environmentally sustainable solutions to reducing uncharacteristic fire hazard through the utilization of small diameter trees and biomass removed in forest thinning efforts.  Before founding SFL twenty years ago, Craig taught sustainable small-scale agriculture at Chico State and often lectured at local universities on sustainable farming practices and holistic agriculture.

Craig is a 37-year resident of the Sierra Nevada and calls the foothills north of Placerville his home.  When he is not working on forest restoration and forest planning Craig and his wife Vivian, operate Seven Grandfathers Farm, the first certified organic acres in El Dorado Co., selling produce at farmers markets, food-co-ops and on the farm.

The June meeting is scheduled for Tuesday June 6th at 6:00 pm at Turtle Rock Park.

The Alpine Biomass Committee is supported by a grant from the National Forest Foundation with funds coming from Region 5 of the U.S. Forest Service.  This organization is an equal opportunity provider.

May Meeting Summary

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Rick Hopson giving his presentation

Our meeting on 02-may-2017 at Turtle Rock Park was well attended with 19 members of the public and agencies present.

Rick Hopson, Amador District Ranger, gave a presentation on the Caples Ecological Restoration Project which is in the Caples Creek watershed in parts of Alpine, Amador and El Dorado counties.  The project will include about 8,800 acres of prescribed burning over the next few years.  To a significant extent the project is happening due to excellent collaboration between various agencies and NGOs.

The West Carson Project Working Group has been making progress on what economic activity can benefit from the West Carson Project.  Discussions centered on a possible firewood business and/or heart-of-center timber.  There is possible interest by the Washoe Tribe in these businesses, but there still are many questions to be answered including where the businesses would be located.  About twenty acres are needed and the BLM will be approached about possible locations.

The Alpine Biomass Committee is sponsoring Alyson Cheney to attend the SCALE (Sierra to California All Lands Enhancement) workshop in Sacramento.  Alyson is an AmeriCorps intern working with the Alpine Watershed Group.  The workshop is sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region, the National Forest Foundation, and the Sierra Institute for Community and Environment to advance peer learning, all-lands management, and capacity-building of community-based and other collaborative forest management groups in California.

Participant updates included the following.  The CHIPS/Washoe Crew is being reconstituted and some of the new members will be from Carson City.  The USFS Carson Ranger District is close to finalizing an agreement with CHIPS.  Teresa McClung is now the Acting Forest Supervisor of the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit while Forest Supervisor Jeff Marsolais has been seconded to the Region 5 office.  CHIPS reported that their proposed biomass-to-bioenergy facility in Wilseyville is number three in the queue and that they have several prospective developers interested in partnering with them.  The current offer to buy such power is $0.13787/Kwh which nobody is taking up.

The next meeting is set for Tuesday June 6th at 6:00 pm at Turtle Rock Park.  Craig Thomas of the Sierra Forest Legacy will be making a presentation.

To contact us you can either leave a comment on this blog, or for a private comment, visit our contact us page.

The Alpine Biomass Committee is supported by a grant from the National Forest Foundation with funds coming from Region 5 of the U.S. Forest Service.  This organization is an equal opportunity provider.